April 19, 2017

Joslyn Art Museum Summer Camps

My first-grade son has a knack for drawing. His favorite subject in school is art.

You bet I’ve signed him up for an art summer camp at Joslyn Art Museum to feed that love of his.

Students work on sculptures during a summer camp at Joslyn Art Museum. Photo courtesy Joslyn Art Museum

I’ve partnered with Joslyn Art Museum to tell you about their fantastic lineup of summer camps because, you guys, they’re great. My son didn’t really want to leave each day and he took so much joy out of showing me what he’s been working on. Andy Smith, Studio Programs Manager, provided a lot of details that you’ll find helpful when considering a Joslyn summer camp.

What makes Joslyn camps unique

Artwork found throughout the museum inspire the activities in the Joslyn Art Museum summer camps. Photo courtesy Joslyn Art Museum

Location. First, obviously, it’s pretty unique to have a camp inside an art museum. Students create with inspiration and guidance from the artists, media and techniques found there. So, they spend time in the gallery learning about the art-making experience and tools, and then also spend ample studio time.

Themes. A lot of camps focus on art fundamentals–paintings, drawing, sculpture and printmaking–and they tend to be the most popular. I was eyeing drawing for my kiddo, and it was already filled. Other camps draw from exhibitions and galleries in the museum, like several camps that will draw from a “Bijoux Parisien: French Jewelry from the Petit Palais, Paris.” Check the camp list here and register ASAP if you see one you think your child would like.

Age range. Very few summer camp have options for as great of an age range as Joslyn Art Museum. In addition to camps for ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-12 the museum offers teen camps in ceramics, printmaking, drawing, painting, and alternative art. If your kid has found his or her passion, they can spend many summers happily pursuing it.

Unique partnerships. This summer, Joslyn Art Museum has partnered with the Union for Contemporary Art, 2423 N. 24th St., a fully equipped artists co-op just down the street from the museum. This is where teens will go for their summer camps. Another partnership is between the museum and The Rose, where kids ages 9-14 work on theater design.

Holiday week mini-camps. Joslyn Art Museum offers one-day camps focused on an art fundamental during Fourth of July week. The bad news: Each day is full right now. You can add your child’s name to a waitlist, though.

What’s a typical camp day?

Kids work in the art studio every day of art camp at Joslyn Art Museum, but they also get to explore the museum, as well. Photo courtesy Joslyn Art Museum

Joslyn Art Museum summer camps are half-days, which you can combine the morning and afternoon to make a full day of camp (full day campers get to have supervised lunch in the outdoors sculpture garden). A typical half-day involves most of the time creating art in the studio, with some time spent in the galleries and in discussions about artworks and artists to provide context for the studio challenges that day. There’s a snack break halfway through camp each day. Artists have to eat, you know. Full-day campers need to bring a sack lunch.

Ready For Joslyn Art Museum Summer Camp?

Joslyn Art Museum summer camps are available for children as young as 4 and for teens. Photo courtesy Joslyn Art Museum

Where: Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge St.

Cost: Camps for ages 4-5, $60 per camp for members and $70 general public (2-hour camps, no snacks); camps for ages 6-8 and 9-12, $80 per camp for members and $100 per camp for general public; camps for teens, $100 per camp for members and $120 per camp for general public (ceramics camps for teens is $200 and $240, respectively).

Register: Online at joslyn.org

 

Disclosure: I received a complimentary camp registration in compensation for writing this post. All opinions expressed in the post are mine, as are the typos.

 

Liked this post?

Get more posts like this delivered straight to your inbox twice a month. Subscribe to the FREE e-newsletter sharing giveaways, new posts and updates to popular posts like this one! Subscribe here.

November 25, 2014

Art Works At Joslyn Art Museum

Joslyn Art Museum’s newest permanent exhibit is good news for families. Art Works opens on Friday, and I want to shout from the museum’s rooftop that you should go check it out – with or without kids.

Art Works is a hands-on space to explore visual art in Omaha.

Art Works is a hands-on space to explore visual art in Omaha.

Think children’s museum meets art museum. And it’s FREE. All FREE!

My family got a chance to preview the exhibit last Saturday. I can’t wait to go back.

Art Works has nine hands-on stations where you can explore visual art:-You can sit at a drawing station and sketch a still life masterpiece; “paint” on a video screen; or try your hand at sketching on a vase.

Mooch builds with magnets.

Mooch builds with magnets.

It truly is an all-ages space – toddlers up to adults will find something there to play with and create.

My kids’ favorite was also mine – the stop-motion Animation Station. It’s quite simple to do and once you try one video, you’ll want to do more.

Farley and I putting the finishing touches to his first movie, Tree Farm.

Farley and I putting the finishing touches to his first movie, Tree Farm.

Or if you’re like me, you’ll find yourself helping your youngster make a movie and then feel the urge to take over because a 3-year-old filmmaker’s vision is so bizarre and needs the visionary guidance of a 30-something.

Or something like that.

 

Here are the stations to explore

Audrey’s Spectrum Sculpture – Think that cool Chihuly sculpture you see in the window as you walk up to the museum’s entrance.

Farley adds his touch to the sculpture.

Farley adds his touch to the sculpture.

Choose colorful shapes to lock together, creating  a glowing 3D sculpture.

Everywhere you look at Art Works you see beauty, including this ever-changing sculpture.

Everywhere you look at Art Works you see beauty, including this ever-changing sculpture.

 

Simon’s Animation Station – The fun part of this station is choosing the props to set your scene. To create your movie, you photograph your story, bit by bit. And then you can see the completed mini-animation on the “big screen” (and then email it to friends and family, or post it on Facebook). It’s so simple that my 3-year-old got the hang of it, with some guidance. Turns out, she’s partial to the Grant Wood backdrop.

Eloise’s Portrait Gallery – You can create a self portrait by drawing on glass with dry eraser or using magnets.

Portrait of a young artist, 2014.

Mr. Wonderful’s self portrait.

 

Wally’s Pattern Place – This was another favorite because of the incredibly loud sound the jumbo beads made when kids lifted them off the rods.

Exploring patterns

Exploring patterns

A helpful volunteered attempted to explain to my children how they could try to recreate a design from one of Joslyn’s American Indian beadwork pieces. They ignored all guidance and went their own route. Either way works.

A volunteer shows Mooch one way to use the space.

A volunteer helps Mooch reach the top of the rod.

 

Freddie’s Techno-Canvas – This hi-tech painting studio is incredible and I foresee long waits to create at this station. It’s all digital and you use artist’s tools to “mix, drip, brush, and push paint” on the wall – or floor!

You don't see me in the background trying to be patient until this girl finishes up. You can't rush art, but darn it, I wanted to play.

You can’t see me in the background trying to be patient until this young artist finishes up. You can’t rush art, but darn it, I wanted to play.

 

I want to go back during the day and paint without my kids.

I was particularly impressed with the floor canvas and how you can “pour” a bucket of paint onto your canvas and spread it around. It was realistic and mess-free.

I loved that. My kids probably missed the mess element.

Charlie’s Observation Studio – This still life scene will change from time to time. At opening, it highlighted Dutch still life (in honor of the museum’s Rembrandt portrait and two Dutch still lifes).

Mooch shows promising technique. It's all in the wrist movement of the scribble.

Mooch shows promising technique. It’s all in the wrist movement of the scribble.

 

Mooch and I sat to sketch and got about 45 seconds into it before she was ready to move on. I’m using that as an excuse for how sad my still life drawing turned out.

Jack’s Vase Space – This spot was the station that first caught my eye. You can use dry-erase crayons to draw on faux ancient Greek pots.

The pots are custom painted to look like works in Joslyn’s collection of ancient Greek pottery.

Both kids fluttered past this station. Perhaps I’ve said a few too many times that they can’t draw on things in our house.

Katie, Roger, Kate, Drew, and Meredith’s Creativity Table – Farley could sit at this table for an hour and be content. This is the make-and-take station (or you can leave your art to be displayed).

Farley loved making his modern art with washi tape.

Farley loved making his modern art with washi tape.

 

All materials are provided and there are images to inspire creativity. The first two featured activities reflect the modern works found in the current temporary exhibit, “In Living Color.” You can create a figure in the style of Keith Haring or use painter’s tape to create a design spired by Joseph Albers’ “Homage to the Square.”

The materials for the project.

The materials for the Joseph Albers-inspired project.

 

It was the square project that captured my preschooler’s imagination. He was proud of his finished artwork.

Barbara’s Curiosity Corner – This adorable reading nook with puppets and books was a spot Mooch kept returning to.

A cozy corner to rest, read or play with puppets.

A cozy corner to rest, read or play with puppets.

 

The area also had different architectural toys like blocks and magnetic pieces both kids enjoyed.

 

The architectural toys included blocks and magnets.

The architectural toys included blocks and magnets.

If you go

 

CCG_9508

Where: Joslyn Art Museum; Memorial Building, lower level east, 2200 Dodge St.

When: Open during all regular museum hours (Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; closed Mondays and major holidays)

 

Restrictions:

– Children must be accompanied by an adult

– School groups are not permitted (teachers are asked to encourage parents to bring children on weekends and Thursday evenings since they will not be visiting during their school tours)

– Strollers are not allowed in Art Works (stroller parking is provided just outside activity space)

 

Stay tuned: Keep an eye out for an upcoming post about two temporary exhibits at Joslyn Art Museum, “In Living Color: Andy Warhol and Contemporary Printmaking” and “BAM! It’s a Picture Book: The Art Behind Graphic Novels.”

 

Disclaimer: Joslyn Art Museum invited my family to preview the exhibit before it was open to the public.

 

More from Oh My! Omaha:

Today’s Giveaways

Joslyn Art Museum With Kids

50 Holiday Activities To Do In Omaha 2014

 

July 2, 2013

Joslyn Art Museum With Children

Edited: Nov. 26, 2014

My earliest memory of the Joslyn Art Museum was a class field trip. I don’t recall visiting the museum with my parents, though. I don’t know if they didn’t trust me – I do have this compulsion to touch merchandise at stores, and Mr. Wonderful thinks my tendancy to drop breakables is like that of Chunk’s from “The Goonies.” Maybe they really thought I’d do some damage at an art museum.

I see the potential in my kids, too, but I still have brought them to Joslyn. Why not, I figured? It’s FREE now.

Don't be fooled. Mooch and other go-go-go toddlers aren't so calm at museums. You've got to be on your toes!
Ha! Ha! Ha! As if this is how our visit went.

I tested the waters recently with Mr. Wonderful and our darling, and turns out touch-feely, children. We – and the priceless works of art – survived, though, and here’s what I learned.

Related post: Tips For Enjoying Gallery Visits With Kids

Taking small children to Joslyn Art Museum

The Art Packs are themed and designed for specific age groups. We went with the Shapes pack for our preschooler and toddler.
The Art Packs are themed and designed for specific age groups. We went with the Shapes pack for our preschooler and toddler.

1. Head to the Scott EdTech Gallery first and pick up a themed backpack (an Art Pack, if you wanna know the lingo). With toddlers in tow, we opted for the mini art pack with a shapes them, which had a board book, a shape sorter and a  suggestion on what to look for in the paintings when you roam the museum. Other focus on architecture and sketching and other stuff beyond my kidlets.

2. If you have your themed backpack and you’ve done the activities, then it’s time to explore. In an ideal world, you’ll stroll casually with your children and they’d say “Look, Mama! There’s a circle!” In my world, I chase Mooch while Mr. Wonderful shuffles along with Farley, leaving cameras and odds and ends behind on benches. Make no goals and you’ll enjoy yourself.

This fountain. I tell you, kids are attracted to it like flies to a Coke bottle.
This fountain. I tell you, kids are attracted to it like flies to a Coke bottle.

3. Visit the fountain. You don’t even need to plan it in your tour, kids seem to find this instinctually. It’s a charming area to sit for a spell, while your children splash your back. Fun!

There are zones designed especially for children at Joslyn.
There are zones designed especially for children at Joslyn.

4. Visit the areas designated for children: The Mind’s Eye Gallery and the open space by the Special Exhibit area (near that cool, swirly Chihuly). The Mind’s Eye Gallery often features a well-known children’s book illustrator, like Dr. Seuss next month (yay!). Upstairs, you’ll find a colorful little corner to rest while your little artist draws, reads or wrecks havoc. Add their creation to the other abstract works of art made by youngsters.

Farley's the Dali of his preschool classroom.
Play, color and read with your children during your visit to Joslyn Art Museum. He’s the Dali in his daycare.

There’s a drawer of games that older kids may enjoy playing as well. Younger ones will enjoy the mess they make.

Play, color and read with your children during your visit to Joslyn Art Museum.
Play, color and read with your children during your visit to Joslyn Art Museum.

5. Consider a trip just to sketch or take pictures. Farley enjoyed taking pictures with his camera (no flash).

Farley fancies himself a budding photographer. He's got the eye.
Farley fancies himself a budding photographer. He’s got the eye.

6. For older children, do a scavenger hunt while you’re there. Get the iArt scavenger hunt for your smartphone here.

Farley in the Discovery Garden.
Farley in the Discovery Garden.

7. End your visit outdoors with a wild rumpus in the sculpture gardens. On the northwest corner, you’ll find the colorful Discovery Garden made just for children. To the east of the museum is the Peter Kiewit Foundation Sculpture Garden. Yes, you can get into the reflecting pool, which is why I suggested you end here.

End your visit on a hot day with a slow walk in the reflective pool. Slow. A hard-learned lesson for some scrappy toddlers.
End your visit on a hot day with a slow walk in the reflective pool. Slow – that was a hard-learned lesson for a particularly scrappy toddler.

* * * * *

More things to know about Joslyn and young children:

– A new space called Art Works opened in November 2014 featuring nine stations to explore various forms of visual art, from sculpture to drawing to animation. Read about the kid-friendly space here.

– There are self-guided art activities for children every other Saturday morning. See details here.

– Joslyn and the Omaha Public Library offer free story time each month. See details here.

* * * * *

Check back tomorrow for a special post about visiting Omaha art galleries with children. Local artist Lori Elliott-Bartle and freelance art writer Suzanne Smith Arney will share tips on making the most of your visit!