January 19, 2017

10 Places You Must See In Nebraska

Celebrate Nebraska’s 150th birthday in 2017 by exploring the state. I’ve been lucky to explore our state with my kids, though there are still some Nebraska attractions on my bucket list left like Chimney Rock and Lake McConaughy.

Want to get out there and explore Nebraska? Here are some of my favorites (in no particular order):

Nebraska attractions

10 Nebraska attractions you must see

1. Fort Robinson State Park (Harrison, Neb.)

Checking out the view from the stagecoach at Fort Robinson.

Western Nebraska’s biggest attraction is one of my favorites, Fort Robinson. A few family favorite adventures were the off-road jeep ride, the carriage ride, and since both kids were so little, the guided horse rides.

2. Holland Performing Arts Center (Omaha)

The concert hall inside the Holland Performing Arts Center. Photo courtesy Nick Allen on Flikr

The best venue, hands down, in all of Nebraska to hear a concert is the main concert hall inside the Holland Performing Arts Center in Omaha. It’s a beautiful building and the sound is incredible. If your favorite performer ever plays there, you must go.

3. Fort Atkinson (Fort Calhoun, Neb.)

Don’t miss the blacksmith during the re-enactment weekends at Fort Atkinson, located in Fort Calhoun, Nebraska.

Located in Fort Calhoun (so pretty close to Omaha), you should time a visit to coincide with an historical re-enactment. I brought the kids to one and it was a lot of fun.

4. Smith Falls State Park (Wood Lake, Neb.)

A view of Smith Falls on a sunny day.

We used to canoe the Niobrara River with friends and family every year, and Smith Falls was always a must-stop destination. It’s the highest waterfall in Nebraska. I dare you to stick your head into the water there.

To get to the Niobrara River, if you’re coming from Omaha at least, will mean passing through the Sandhills, which is another pretty sight to see.

5. Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium (Omaha)

On hot days, the aquarium at Omaha’s zoo is a great place to escape the heat.

The most popular Nebraska attraction, by far, is Omaha’s zoo. It’s huge, it’s beautiful, and it keeps getting better. Some of the newest additions include African Grasslands and Alaskan Adventure sprayground. Here are some experts’ tips on visiting the zoo.

6. Arbor Day Farm Tree Adventure (Nebraska City, Neb.)

Happy and mud-covered children at Arbor Day Tree Adventure.

This Nebraska City attraction is so cool, we try to visit every season each year. The forest trail, the treehouse, the inviting natural play areas…I love it. I might also love the fact that it’s next door to a place that serves fabulous apple pie and has a wine tasting room.

7. Toadstool Geological Park (Oglala National Grasslands)

Let’s play “Spot the trail” in this picture at Toadstool.

This is off the beaten path, but definitely worth a visit to see this place and hike around. They’re pretty much Nebraska’s own Badlands. Careful hiking around there with little ones, though.

8. Brownville, Neb.

In the center of Brownville on Main Street, you’ll find this old cabin.

So much art and culture packed into a little Nebraska town. Browse bookstores, art galleries, or check out a winery.

The town is also near Indian Cave State Park. I recommend combining a visit to both for a complete day.

9. Memorial Stadium (Lincoln, Neb.)

A sea of red at Memorial Stadium. Photo courtesy Asten on Flikr

It’s something to experience at least once: The football stadium becomes the third most populated “city” in Nebraska on Husker game day. Wear red or else.

10. Nebraska Wildlife Safari (Ashland, Neb.)

You have to beware of animals crossing the road at the Nebraska Wildlife Safari.

I’m a sucker for driving among bison, I guess. This is a great attraction that showcases Nebraska’s wildlife. Get out of the car to see the bears, wolves, bald eagles and other critters out there.

Honorable mentions Nebraska attractions

A few more favorite places in Nebraska that didn’t make the Top 10 cut: Omaha’s Old Market, Plattsmouth’s Sisters Thai and German Cafe, and Chadron State Park.

* * * * *

There are a lot of exhibits and events planned to celebrate the 150th. Check out the calendar of events here.

 

Your turn: What is on your must-see list for Nebraska?

August 15, 2016

Kids & The Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum

The Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum has created a space for children of all ages to explore STEM ideas (that’s science, technology, engineering, and math).

 

The Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum opened the new Children's Learning Center in early August 2016.

The Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum opened the new Children’s Learning Center in early August 2016.

 

The new Children’s Learning Center opened last weekend. It consists of 10 interactive stations designed as an out-of-classroom experience for children to experiment and learn about science, technology, engineering, and math and the physics, forces, and technology of flight. Families can easily spend an hour here, especially if the children get into building structures at a couple of the stations.

One engineering station asks kids to build a building or bridge the can stand up to an earthquake.

One engineering station asks kids to build a building or bridge the can stand up to an earthquake.

I explored with my preschooler and first-grader and they had as much fun as the older kids there. Some activities were better suited for the limited patience of little ones than others, but with the help of an adult, they could build and experiment alongside the big kids. 

Thank you to the Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum for the complimentary passes so I can visit and get some great pictures. It was a fun day!

What you’ll find at the Children’s Learning Center

The Bernouli Blower was a beacon for little ones with the the colorful beach balls.

The Bernouli Blower was a beacon for little ones with the the colorful beach balls.

Bernoulli Blower: Discover the principles of airflow and how air speed and pressure effects objects, like beach balls.

KEVA Planks: Create structures and gain first-hand experience with balance, leverage, geometry and the principles of physics.

Children build structures that can stand up to the shaking earthquake table.

Children build structures that can stand up to the shaking earthquake table.

Make-it-Tables: Experience the engineering design process by building machines or structures using materials provided.

Interactive Kiosk Station: Explore the four forces of flight.

Kids race their LEGO cars on a test track at the Children's Learning Center.

Kids race their LEGO cars on a test track at the Children’s Learning Center.

Wind Trainer: Learn about the science and technology of flight in terms of aircraft roll, pitch and yaw.

Dual Test Track: Learn how friction, drag, weight distribution, and gravity affect the design and operation of aircraft and other vehicles.

The area with the large blue foam blocks was like a free-play engineering playground.

The area with the large blue foam blocks was like a free-play engineering playground.

Innovation Station: Create inventions, environments, and activities with large scale foam blocks that encourage teamwork and imagination.  

Quake Table: Design structures and explore the phenomena of earthquakes and their effects.

The tennis ball launcher almost always had a wait on opening day. There's something making things airborne that draws a crowd.

The tennis ball launcher almost always had a wait on opening day. There’s something making things airborne that draws a crowd.

Tennis Ball Launcher: Explore the effects of gravity on different sized and massed objects.

Twin Air Blaster: Experience how airflow impacts aircraft design.

 

What else is for kids at the museum?

The Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum in Ashland, Neb., is a must-visit if your kids are fascinated by airplanes and spacecraft.

The Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum in Ashland, Neb., is a must-visit if your kids are fascinated by airplanes and spacecraft.

If your kid loves planes, you’re set. This place has a ton of them, and many that you can peek inside. There’s also an area dedicated to Nebraska’s astronaut, Clayton Anderson, who’s from Ashland, Neb.

There are a few items that are an additional cost to admission, but can be a big hit with kids. My kids can’t resist a bounce house, so that one is always a stop for us.

There’s also a planetarium, small 50-cent rides, and flight simulators.

If you go

Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum

Where: 28210 West Park Highway, Ashland, Neb. (about 30 miles west of Omaha)

When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 7 days a week; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve; closed: New Year’s Day, Easter, Thanksgiving & Christmas

Cost: Adults, $12; senior citizens, military, $11; children (ages 4-12), $6; FREE for children aged 3 and younger

Extras: Planetarium shows, $3 for adults and $2 for children ages 4-12 (free for members); all-day bounce house, $5 per child; flight simulators, 2D rides are $9 for members $10 for non-members, and 3D rides are $12 for members $13 for non-members.

Website 

 

Upcoming 2017 events for families

Here are a few of the upcoming events and programs offered at Strategic Air Command and Aerospace Museum. Find more events here, and explore the educational offerings here.

Aug. 21 – Total Solar Eclipse Viewing

Oct. 7 & 8 – Planes, Trains & Autos (Super Hero Day within this event is Oct. 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.)

Oct. 21 – Night at the Museum: Robotics

Dec. 2 – Santa Goes to Space

 

July 19, 2016

Trail Rides & Pony Rides At Mahoney State Park

There are surprisingly few places to go trail riding within 30 or so miles of Omaha. One option is at Mahoney State Park out in Ashland, Nebraska, which is about midway between Omaha and Lincoln.

Mahoney Horse Collage

I’ve gone horseback riding at Mahoney as a kid and recently, I decided that it was time to hop back on the saddle, and this time, bring my son along for his first horse ride. My daughter wasn’t old enough for a trail ride, so she’d have to settle for a pony ride.

Mahoney State Park is family-favorite place to explore in any season, but this summer was the first time we went just for the horses. I learned a few things with my spur-of-the-moment trip. It didn’t work out for us, all trail ride slots were filled, but maybe it could work out for you if you plan ahead.

Before you trot out to Mahoney to take the kiddos on a trail ride, there are a few things you should know about horse trail rides there.

Mahoney State Park Trail Rides Information

Horse trail rides at Mahoney State Park are $18 for ages 6 and older. Photo courtesy Nebraska Tourism

Horse trail rides at Mahoney State Park are $18 for ages 6 and older. Photo courtesy Nebraska Tourism

1. You can only buy tickets at the administration office. Call ahead of time to see if there are spots left, (402) 944-2523.

2. Trail rides are for ages 6 and older.

3. Trail rides last about 45 minutes to an hour.

4. Trail rides are $18.

5. Horse trail rides run from May to October.

6. Holiday weekends are the busiest times at Mahoney State Park. Which drives home point No. 1. Call ahead.

 

My grand plan of taking my son out on his first trail ride didn’t pan out, but pony rides turned out to be a decent backup option.

 

Mahoney State Park Pony Rides Information

Farley on a not-so-little pony ride. Pony rides at Mahoney State Park are $6 seasonally.

Farley on a not-so-little pony ride. Pony rides at Mahoney State Park are $6 and are offered seasonally.

1. Kids ages 3-9 can ride the ponies.

2. Pony rides run from May to October.

3. Pony rides are $6 and you pay at the stables.

I think $6 is a little steep for a five-minute pony ride in a circle. I made the rookie parent mistake of promising them a pony ride before knowing the price…and you know there’s no backing out of that kind of promise.

 

Your turn: Have you done a trail ride at Mahoney State Park yet? Have you taken your kids on one?

June 24, 2016

Living History At Fort Atkinson In Nebraska

Fort Atkinson is a Nebraska State Historical Park in Fort Calhoun, which is a short drive north of Omaha. Considering how close it is to Omaha, it’s been a major oversight that I’ve never visited, especially since there are monthly events that are incredibly interesting for families.

Mooch learns a little sewing technique from a seamstress during a living history weekend event at Fort Atkinson in Nebraska.

Mooch learns a little sewing technique from a seamstress during a living history weekend event at Fort Atkinson in Nebraska.

You can visit any time of year to explore the fort, but for I cannot recommend enough that you try to time a visit for a historical re-enactment.

Historic re-enactments

Actresses walking along the north side of Fort Atkinson, located in Fort Calhoun, Nebraska.

Actresses walking along the north side of Fort Atkinson, located in Fort Calhoun, Nebraska.

I never thought of myself as being into re-enactments, but my opinion has evolved, especially after attending the June historic re-enactment of fort life in the 1820s at Fort Atkinson. I was impressed and could not believe more people don’t know about it.

Don't miss the blacksmith during the re-enactment weekends at Fort Atkinson, located in Fort Calhoun, Nebraska.

Don’t miss the blacksmith during the re-enactment weekends at Fort Atkinson, located in Fort Calhoun, Nebraska.

On the first Saturday and Sunday of the month, May through October, Friends of Fort Atkinson recreate life 200 years ago. Their attention to detail and characters they create is great, and made the whole experience fascinating.

A peek inside one of the rooms at Fort Atkinson.

A peek inside one of the rooms at Fort Atkinson.

Rooms throughout the fort are recreated with the typical items of the time and characters describing what their life would’ve been like.

One of the first rooms you'll likely enter when you first get there is the Colonel's office.

One of the first rooms you’ll likely enter when you first get there is the Colonel’s office.

The blacksmith shop looked as real as it gets. You could also watch ladies weave, men make barrels or talk to soldiers getting ready for battle.

And for the serious history buffs, it was acknowledged that there wouldn’t be any women found inside the fort back in its hay day. The actresses explained why that some recreations were done just to give a better idea of life at the time – whether it was cooking, sewing or selling goods.

Ladies in the kitchen at Fort Atkinson. They'll be the first to tell visitors women weren't allowed in the fort back in the day, though. They're part of the re-enactments to give insight to what life was like outside of the fort.

Ladies in the kitchen at Fort Atkinson. They’ll be the first to tell visitors women weren’t allowed in the fort back in the day, though. They’re part of the re-enactments to give insight to what life was like outside of the fort.

What kids will like about Fort Atkinson

When you arrive at the fort, stop at the info table to grab a scavenger hunt.

The outside of Fort Atkinson doesn't really indicate much of what's waiting for your family inside, does it?

The outside of Fort Atkinson doesn’t really indicate much of what’s waiting for your family inside, does it?

Kids need to ask the re-enactors questions in order to successfully finish the hunt. This provides shy kids with talking points to interact with the actors. It was a handy way to learn about things you wouldn’t think to ask about.

Kids can take their finished scavenger hunt to the general store and receive a free piece of rock candy.

The general store at Fort Atkinson is a working store where you can buy gifts, treats and, apparently, barrels.

The general store at Fort Atkinson is a working store where you can buy gifts, treats and, apparently, barrels.

Speaking of that store, this is another kid-favorite if only because they have candy, lemonade and toys. Good luck leaving it without a treat.

Mooch and my dad enjoying an afternoon snack and lemonade on the porch of the general store.

Mooch and my dad enjoying an afternoon snack and lemonade on the porch of the general store.

You don’t have to do the scavenger hunt, of course. We didn’t. The kids still found ways to interact, helping sew a quilt and trying on the colonel’s hat, for instance.

One thing to note: They fire a cannon during the re-enactments. Some kids are going to love the loud boom and others won’t (cover their ears regardless). My kids were not fans.

The cannon is prepped to be fired at Fort Atkinson.

The cannon is prepped to be fired at Fort Atkinson.

If you go

Historical Re-enactments at Fort Atkinson State Historical Park

Where: 201 S. Seventh St., Fort Calhoun, Neb.

When: First Saturday and Sunday of the month through October. The first weekend in July has a focus on the Fourth of July and the Declaration of Independence will be read aloud. Park is open year-round 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visitor Center is open Monday through Friday from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Cost: Valid state park permit is required. Visitor Center is $2 for adults, $1 for children under 13, and FREE for children under 3.

Friends of Fort Atkinson Website

June 12, 2016

Exploring Fremont Lakes With Kids

Less than an hour-long drive from Omaha is one of eastern Nebraska’s top destinations for outdoorsy families: Fremont Lakes State Recreation Area. This large park has several beaches for day trippers as well as campsites. It’s a great park close enough to Omaha for those looking for a dip in a lake or relaxing under the shade of trees.

Drive around the lakes at Fremont Lakes State Recreation Area, and you might find beaches that are quieter than others.

Drive around the lakes at Fremont Lakes State Recreation Area, and you might find beaches that are quieter than others.

What You’ll Find At Fremont Lakes

It’s not like a state park in the sense that you’ll find daily programming and a lot of facilities, but it’s not lacking either.

At the biggest lake, Victory Lake, you’ll find a bar and grill/convenience store with a sand volleyball pit. It sells soda and beer, snacks and bait.

The Tow Line is a bar and grill/bait shop at Victory Lake, located in Fremont Lakes SRA.

The Tow Line is a bar and grill/bait shop at Victory Lake, located in Fremont Lakes SRA.

Around Victory Lake, you’ll also find playgrounds, several bathrooms (some with running water) and the park administration office.

We found a table and grill at Victory Lake and that’s where we spent most of our afternoon there. It was great, since it right by a beach and park (and a short distance from another newer park, too).

Water activities

Fremont Lakes_blog

My kids are content just playing in the sand and splashing in the shallow beach areas. You can find swimming beaches on Lakes 9, 10, 15 and 20. Swim at your own risk – there are no lifeguards here.

You’ll find boaters, jet skiers and water skiers, around a couple of the lakes, as well.

Other lakes are designated fishing lakes.

Camping

Some campgrounds can be reserved ahead of time. Find out what’s available HERE.

We didn’t check out campsites too closely, so I’ve got no recommendations on which is best.

Anyone have campsite recommendations?

More about the lakes

Getting to Fremont Lakes SRA is a bit confusing for first-timers, especially if you’re specifically looking for a beach or a fishing lake. The park is spread out with more than one entrance.

Before setting up in a spot, drive around to be sure you’ve seen it all.

We stopped at the first clear beach we could find. While it felt like a private beach, there was a reason no one was there. Two reasons.

Wind.

And glass. Everywhere.

We moved on before one of us got a shard in the foot and found Victory Lake. The wind was buffered a bit, and it was definitely a busier lake.

We found two playgrounds around Victory Lake. If kids ever tire of splashing in the water, they're a nice alternative for play.

We found two playgrounds around Victory Lake. If kids ever tire of splashing in the water, they’re a nice alternative for play.

Beyond water sports and playgrounds, families have several other activity options if you plan ahead. We brought bikes, and the flat park provided an easy outing. There isn’t a bike path so you have to be comfortable on the road.

We also had some bread to feed the geese.

Feeding the greedy, fat geese at Victory Lake at the Fremont Lakes State Recreation Area.

Feeding the geese at Victory Lake at the Fremont Lakes State Recreation Area.

YOUR TURN:

What are some other things your family loves to do at Fremont Lakes SRA?

 

If you go

Fremont Lakes State Recreation Area

Where: 4349 W. State Lakes Road, Fremont, Neb. I marked the map for Victory Lake so you can easily find our favorite spot in the park.

Cost: A state park permit is required for entrance. Swimming is free once you’re in the park. Bring your own watercraft.

April 8, 2016

What’s New In Downtown Lincoln

Have you been to downtown Lincoln, Neb., lately? There are a few new things to see if it’s been awhile:

– Lincoln Children’s Museum new additions

– Nebraska History Museum re-opens

– Centennial Mall’s redesign

I visited with my 6-year-old during a recent day of Spring Break to check things out.

What’s new at Lincoln Children’s Museum

 

The Lincoln Children's Museum

The Lincoln Children’s Museum

 

It’s been two years since we last visited Lincoln Children’s Museum, but two of the biggest updates have only happened at the end of last year: Cuckoo Construction and The Grow Zone. The museum gave my family complimentary admission so I could tell you all about them.

You can’t miss Cuckoo Construction, literally. The three-story exhibit catches your kid’s attention right when you walk in.

The view of Cuckoo Construction from the museum's lowest level. The third level has a wheel chair-accessible entrance.

The view of Cuckoo Construction from the museum’s lowest level. The third level has a wheel chair-accessible entrance.

Farley made a beeline for it even before I could get us into the museum.

Cuckoo Construction, presented by Hausmann Construction, is a clock tower kids can climb, but the fun part is all the construction they can do.

Foam bricks fall every 15 minutes from the Cuckoo Construction tower.

Foam bricks fall every 15 minutes from the Cuckoo Construction tower.

Kids rush to build walls, sending them up a conveyor belt or moving them with a mini wheelbarrow.  Every 15 minutes, the cuckoo comes out and cues the walls of bricks to come tumbling down.

Kids love it and for a second, I thought my son wasn’t ever going to leave that exhibit.

The Grow Zone at Lincoln Children's Museum is a new area for children 3 and younger.

The Grow Zone at Lincoln Children’s Museum is a new area for children 3 and younger.

Farley was too old for the new Grow Zone and determined to play elsewhere, so I only got a peek at it from the outside. This area is separated from the big kids stuff and looks like a little garden. It’s a calm play zone for children younger than 3. It’s a huge upgrade from what was in its place before.

Nebraska History Museum reopens

The Nebraska History Museum exterior was freshened up just as the interior was. "Inside Out" is the name of the artwork on the walls, showing pedestrian and passing cars a hint of what's inside.

The Nebraska History Museum exterior was freshened up just as the interior was. “Inside Out” is the name of the artwork on the walls, showing pedestrian and passing cars a hint of what’s inside.

Confession: I’ve never been to the Nebraska History Museum until last week when it was about to reopen. It’s been around for decades. Anyway, I can’t offer any thoughts on the improvements. But from what I gathered on the preview tour of the museum, the updates were sorely needed and the museum is ready for bigger and better things.

Artifacts on the second floor of the Nebraska History Museum.

Artifacts on the second floor of the Nebraska History Museum.

On two floors, the museum tells Nebraska’s story through displays, photography and audio/visuals. My 6-year-old tagged along on the tour, but I think this is the kind of place that would be enjoyed by multi-generations together. I think it would’ve been fun to have my dad along with us.

The first floor features a quilt display, which signage explaining who made each, why, and where they were made.

The quilts offered a unique glimpse into every day life of Nebraskans from more than 100 years ago. This one was made as a wedding gift and the display included the wedding invitation.

The quilts offered a unique glimpse into every day life of Nebraskans from more than 100 years ago. This one was made as a wedding gift and the display included the wedding invitation.

There’s also a photography exhibit by Barbara and Ralph Fox, which my son enjoyed, especially the photos of a blizzard, flood and the Nebraska State Fair (not in that order), and a gift shop.

Photos in the exhibit "American Dreams in the Cold War: Photos by Barbara and Ralph Fox."

Photos in the exhibit “American Dreams in the Cold War: Photos by Barbara and Ralph Fox.”

The second floor had the really good stuff and will be where most families will spend the most time. For kids, there’s a corner with hands-on activities, clothes for dress up and a teepee to climb in.

Churning butter at the Nebraska History Museum.

Churning butter at the Nebraska History Museum.

The majority of the floor is “Nebraska Unwrapped: Selections from the Collections,” and it takes us through the state’s history via displays of artifacts from colorful beaded sneakers and ball gowns to audio recordings, books and so much more. Some items were more than 1,000 years old. 

Beaded sneakers at the Nebraska History Museum.

Beaded sneakers at the Nebraska History Museum.

There’s also a photography exhibit on that floor called “Photographers and the Plains Indians.” The tour guide had some pretty interesting stories explaining some of the portraits.

Farley was fascinated by some of the stories about the Native Americans in some of the photographs.

Farley was fascinated by some of the stories about the Native Americans in some of the photographs.

The nice thing about this museum is that admission is FREE (donations accepted). They have a free tour every day at 2 p.m. and on the weekends this april, they’ll offer arts and crafts.

The Nebraska History Museum is super close to the children’s museum, and you can easily visit both in a visit. I recommend going to the history museum first, because it’s a struggle to get kids out of a children’s museum.

New look of Centennial Mall

The Centennial Mall was built in 1967 to commemorate the state's 100th anniversary. It's a scenic connection between Nebraska's most important institutions: the State Capitol and the University of Nebraska.

The Centennial Mall was built in 1967 to commemorate the state’s 100th anniversary. It’s a scenic connection between Nebraska’s most important institutions: the State Capitol (pictured, obviously) and the University of Nebraska.

Centennial Mall is undergoing a redesign and it’s going to be a pretty cool thing to check out once it’s all finished – especially the area by the Lincoln Children’s Museum and the Nebraska History Museum.

The mall stretches from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus to the State Capitol Building, from K Street to R Street. Each block will have its own theme.

The plaza by the children’s museum will be “Sparking the Good Life – Imagination to Innovation” (P to R streets), and the highlight will undoubtedly be the sprayground (they call it a “kinetic water feature” but we all know what that means). It will also have an art alcove and an amphitheater-type seating area.

Farley tried to find our county among the tiles lining one block of the mall.

Farley tried to find our county among the tiles lining one block of the mall.

Other themes include:

“We the People” (K to L streets) – There will be a formal, ceremonial plaza with a fountain, and it will recognize “Watchful citizens” and state leaders.

“Our Home Nebraska” (L to M streets) – The hope for this block is that students and visitors will congregate there to learn more about Nebraska. The state’s natural resources will be highlighted here, with a block-wide outline of the state with rivers and eco-regions featured.

“Mosaic of Nebraskans” (M to P streets) – This three-block area highlights the people, cultures, and organizations that have come together over time to create a social quilt of Nebraskans.

 

If you go

Lincoln Children’s Museum

Where: 1420 P St., Lincoln, Neb.

When: Open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursdays, 9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m.; closed Mondays and some major holidays

Cost: $9.50 (2-61), $9 (62+), $6.50 (1 year old), FREE (under 1)

Website 

 

Nebraska History Museum

Where: 131 Centennial Mall North, Lincoln, Neb.

When: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 1 to 4:30 p.m.

Cost: FREE (suggested donation is $2)

Website 

Current exhibits

 

Nebraska’s Centennial Mall

Where: Extends north from the State Capitol seven blocks on what would be 15th Street

Website